That Ismene Is

Character Changes Involving Antigone and Creon
Character Changes Involving Antigone and Creon
Character Changes Involving Antigone and Creon In Sophocles’ Greek tragedy, Antigone, two characters undergo character changes. During the play the audience sees these two characters’ attitudes change from close minded to open-minded. It is their close minded, stubborn attitudes, which lead to their decline in the play, and ultimately to a series of deaths. In the beginning Antigone is a close minded character who later becomes open minded. After the death of her brothers, Eteocles and Polyneice
Antigone
Antigone
Antigone Is he not my brother, and yours, wether you like it or not? I shall never desert him, never. Antigone strongly stands for what she believes in. Because of different personalites and beliefs, many unfortunate events occur in the play, Antigone, by Sophocles. Although Antigone and Ismene love and support each other as sisters, each of them have differnt values and viewpoints. Antigone is known for her strong positive beliefs. In the story, Sophocles portrays her as the protagonist in the
Antigone by Sophocles is one of the most distingui
Antigone by Sophocles is one of the most distingui
Antigone by Sophocles is one of the most distinguished pieces of theatrical work that reflects upon Greek mythology and culture. Antigone has several themes and circumstantial settings that can be indirectly referred or related to in modern society. Sophocles uses various and strategically placed characters to present his play as well as his themes. The play mainly revolves around Antigone who acts alongside her elder sister, Ismene. Both are daughters of Oedipus and Jocasta who are in the conte
Who Is the Tragic Hero, Antigone or Creon?
Who Is the Tragic Hero, Antigone or Creon?
Who Is the Tragic Hero, Antigone or Creon? This analysis is to determine the character that fits the tragic hero profile; it was completely based according to the Aristotelian idea of tragic hero and it is understood that hero is: ...neither purely evil or purely wicked; the hero must born in the high social status, and he/she must possess a tragic flaw which is proper from the inner side of the character; it usually manifests in the form of poor judgment and or arrogance, condemning him/hersel