"The Story of an Hour" and "The Storm" are two greatly appreciated pieces of work
written by Kate Chopin. The two stories differentiate in attitude toward marriage and its
outstanding outcomes. The writer, Kate Chopin, shares many opinions on how marriage may
oneís life ; this includes a controlling marriage, a doubtful marriage, and a loving marriage.

Living life in a marriage of control allows one-self to be extremely indulged in
self-torment. No person can appreciate marriage in which one can not enjoy what it has to offer.

In "The Story of an Hour," Mrs. Mallardís marriage was assumed to be a controlled one, as
when her husband was gone, she felt more joy then ever before. This type of marriage is
frowned upon by many.

When one has doubt in a marriage, it can most likely come from saddened trust within
the relationship. This can start from the very beginning in a relationship and never end, due to
both participants of the marriage being frightened to speak of their trust, as it might destroy the
relationship. Neither of Chopinís stories display this type of marriage, but it is frequent in
reality.

Some may say living life in a loving marriage is one of the most substantial parts of life.

As seen in "The Storm," when the relationship of the two, supposedly living in nine-teenth
century France, use their love for eachother to derive the evil consuming and plagueing their
town and drowning their fears. Seeing pure love is seeing a most powerful force capable of
overcoming anything in its way, even evil.

All these types of marriages conclude implied attitude in Chopinís work. From a
controlled marriage, to a doubtful marriage, down to the very best of a loving marriage, one may
see how the two stories, "The Story of an Hour" and "The Storm" have differences in attitude
toward marriage.