"The Lamb" and "The Tiger"

William Blake wrote poems that deal with creation, "The Lamb" and

"The Tiger". The themes of both poems are the same; however, they are
different in tone and imagery.

"The Lamb" and "The Tiger" are similar in the theme, that asks about
creation. The lamb is asked, "Dost thou know who made thee? The lamb is
told, "he is called by thy name, for he calls himself a Lamb". The lamb is
created in the imagery of Jesus Christ. "The Tiger is asked, "What immortal
hand or eye could frame thy fearful symmetry. The tiger is told: "Did he who
made the lamb make thee? Both "The Lamb" and "The Tiger" are created by
the same creator which sets a similar tone.

Although the poems are similar in theme they differ greatly in tone.

The tone of the lamb is gentle, which is shown by words such as "tender
voice" and "softest clothing". "The Tiger" is much more forceful, which is
shown by words such as "burning bright" and "twist the senews" are used to
show forcefulness in this poem.

In addition to being different in tone, the poems are also different in
imagery. The lamb shows images of innocence. Some examples are:

"delight", "wooly bright", "tender voice", "meek", and "mild". "The Tiger"
shows imagery of experience. Some examples are: "distant", "burnt", and"immortal". These poems are the opposite of each other in imagery.

"The Lamb" and "The Tiger" are very similar in theme but not in tone
and imagery. The lamb is gentle and the tiger is forceful. The tiger is
experienced and the lamb is innocent. This poem shows that even though two
things are created by the same creator, they may be different in appearance
and actions.