Medea's plan is to kill Jason's new bride and his two children she had bore for him and then flee for Athens. The chorus tries to console Medea and tell her not to do such horrid things to other people particularly her children. Medea ignores their request and is stuck with the decision of whether or not to kill her children. She loves them and does not want to but she knows she must kill them to get back at her husband who had wronged her though she had done so much for him.

She goes through with the act of killing Jason's new bride - Medea's children bring her a poisoned gown, which also ends up killing the King of Corinth. - And then faces the tough act of murdering her own children who she loves dearly. She does the awful deed and refuses to allow Jason access to their bodies to bury them or the ability to say goodbye to them. Ah... Sweet Revenge

This story follows the usual Greek tragedy plot and story line and Euripides conveys his idea of a woman well. The concept of a dominant female is still applicable in today's world. Medea is still a popular story today because of this. The theme may not be one, which is good - that of revenge - but in the case of Medea it works well.