Arnold Mesches uses a direct and outspoken type of art to present the work, Art

In Public Places I. He is an abstract expressionist who’s work has become less
literal in the past few years. Mesches started exhibiting in 1945 with the support
of his wife. Meshes has a very original way of making his work. He takes a very
famous painting, paints it on the canvas, then he blends over it by scratching and
scraping. Then he paints over the old one with one of his own. Thus, creating a
whole new painting.

Art In Public Places I is a perfect example of this. In the background he
has placed the March of Liberty, a painting with the Statue of Liberty and people
marching. After blending and scratching that, he placed two people being hung.

There is much significance to these two people because they are Mussolini and
his mistress. Hanging upside down, and by their feet, signifies that freedom has
come because Mussolini is dead. Mesches also shows that freedom is here to
stay becuase of the Statue of Liberty, with all the people around it. The statue
has always been a sign of freedom, so when Mesches placed this in the
background, he knew exactly what he was doing.